Last edited by Mazukus
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis found in the catalog.

Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis

James M. Engel

Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis

a bibliography

by James M. Engel

  • 249 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Myotis sodalis -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes indexes.

    Statementby James M. Engel.
    SeriesSpecial scientific report--wildlife ;, no. 196
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSK361 .A256 no. 196, Z7997.B3 .A256 no. 196, QL737.C595 .A256 no. 196
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 11 p. ;
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4879886M
    LC Control Number76008023

    The membrane extending from the tail to the hind legs is known as the interfemoral membrane. The dorsal pelage of the Indiana bat differs from that of the other three species of Myotis in being somewhat tricolored. Each hair is black at its base, grayish in the middle, and has a cinnamon-brown tip. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis (Scientific publications) [Hall, John Sylvester] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A life history and taxonomic study of the Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis (Scientific publications)Author: John Sylvester Hall.

    Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis Status: State: Endangered Federal: Endangered Identification The Indiana bat is a medium-sized member of the genus Myotis. The head and body length ranges from 41 to 49 mm (1 5/8 - 1 7/8 in.), while the forearm length ranges from 35 to 41 mm (1 3/8 - 1 5/8 in.) (US FWS ). The species closely resembles the little. The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a medium-sized mouse-eared bat native to North America. It lives primarily in southern and midwestern states and in parts of the south of the United States and is listed as an endangered species. The Indiana bat is gray, black, or chestnut in color and is –2 inches and weighs – grams ( – oz.).

    Acoustic monitoring and radio-tracking were used to study the nocturnal activity of adult female Indiana bats Myotis sodalis at a maternity site in Michigan, U.S.A. Pregnant bats did not use the Author: Allen Kurta. Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Draft Recovery Plan: First Revision April Edited by Lori Pruitt U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Region 3 Bloomington, Indiana, Field Office and Leslie TeWinkel U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Region 3 Regional Office – Fort Snelling, Minnesota For Region 3 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fort Snelling, Minnesota.


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Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis by James M. Engel Download PDF EPUB FB2

The scientific name of the Indiana bat is Myotis sodalis and it is an accurate description of the species. Myotis means “mouse ear” and refers Myotis sodalis book the relatively small, mouse-like ears of the bats in this group. Sodalis is the Latin word for “companion.” The Indiana bat is a very social species; large numbers cluster together during.

Myotis sodalis, also known as the Indiana bat, is found only in North America. Their range spans from Iowa, Missouri, and northern Arkansas east to western Virginia and North Carolina, and north into New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

The Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis, is a small bat with a weight that ranges from approximately 5 to 11 grams. The forearm ranges from approximately 36 to mm, the hind foot from approximately 8 to 10mm, the tail length from approximately 27 to 44mm, and the ear height from approximately 12 to.

The Indiana myotis was one of the first bat species in the United States to be recognized as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Act. This listing was largely due to declines recorded at winter hibernation sites in caves, which, until very recently, were the only known roosts for.

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) 5-Year Review: Summary and Evaluation Technical Report (PDF Available) September with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Jul 5, - She grew up small & she flew alright, with those Indiana Bats in the Indiana night. See more ideas about Indiana, Mammals and Bat species pins.

Indiana bat Indiana Bat. Description. The Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis, is a small bat with a weight that ranges from approximately 5 to 11 grams.

The forearm ranges from approximately Indiana bat to mm, the hind foot from approximately 8 to 10mm, the tail length from approximately 27 to 44mm, and the ear height from approximately 12 to 15mm.

Disclaimer: ITIS taxonomy is based on the latest scientific consensus available, and is provided as a general reference source for interested parties.

However, it is not a legal authority for statutory or regulatory purposes. While every effort has been made to provide the most reliable and up-to-date information available, ultimate legal requirements with respect to species are contained in Biological classification: Species.

The Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis, is classified by the Department of Interior as an endangered species. In developing a plan that will enable the recovery of the bat from its endangered predicament, an extensive search was made for literature concerning the species.

Indiana bats are dark gray or brown bats with soft fur. They look similar to little brown bats and northern long-eared bats. One way that scientists can tell the difference between these species is by the size of their feet and the length of their toe hairs.

Indiana bats are about inches (nine. Species profile about species listing status, federal register publications, recovery, critical habitat, conservation planning, petitions, and life history U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System. The Indiana myotis is a medium-sized bat closely related to the little brown myotis, gray myotis, and northern long-eared myotis.

Indiana bats have brownish-gray fur with cinnamon overtones. The ears and wing membranes are blackish-brown. Indiana bats are difficult to distinguish from our other myotises (mouse-eared bats).

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens) • Female Indiana bat tracked ESA: • Protects the Indiana and Gray Bats from take (harming, harassing, killing) and also their critical habitat Spec Book Update.

Title: GDOT PowerPoint Template. ("Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Draft Recovery Plan: First Revision", ; Gargas, et al., ) Like many North American bats, Indiana bats are threatened by a disease called “white-nose syndrome,” where a fungus grows on their noses while they are hibernating.

This causes the bats wake up from hibernation and use up all of their energy. () Indiana Bat Myotis Sodalis, Natural Resources, Department of Preview.

PDF File SizekB. Abstract. Data sheet produced by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is about different times of animals, insects, snakes, birds, fish, butterflies, etc. that can be found in Iowa. Iowa Center for the Book. examining the suitability of the little brown bat (myotis lucifugus) as a surrogate for the endangered indiana bat (m.

sodalis). a thesis submitted to the graduate school in partial fulfullment of the requirements for a master of science degree by: scott m. bergeson department of biology ball state university muncie, indiana advisor: dr. Myotis sodalis Miller and Allen, - Indiana bat; Myotis stalkeri Thomas, - Kei myotis; Myotis taiwanensis Ärnbäck-Christie-Linde, [footnote 11] Myotis thysanodes Miller, - fringed myotis; Myotis tricolor (Temminck, ) - Cape hairy bat, little brown bat, Temminck's mouse-eared bat, Cape myotis, tricoloured mouse-eared bat Class: Mammalia.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Review of the forest habitat relationships of the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Newton Square, PA: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest. A model of the habitat used by the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) during the summer in Indiana: field studies. Project E, Study No. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife.

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Common Name Indiana Myotis/Indiana Bat Scientific Name Myotis sodalist Status The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lists the Indiana myotis as Endangered throughout its range.

West Virginia Status West Virginia is on the edge of the range of. The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a small (7–10 g), insectivorous species that lives only in the eastern United States (Thomson ).The species was declared endangered in the United States inunder the Endangered Species Preservation Act ofbecause of large decreases in population size and an apparent lack of critical habitat in winter (Clawson ; United States Fish Cited by: A Life History and Taxonomic Study of the Indiana Bat, Myotis Sodalis Paperback – January 1, by J.

Hall (Author), Maps Photos (Illustrator) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Author: J. Hall.INDIANA BAT, Myotis sodalis, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE DIVISION OF ENDANGERED SPECIES SPECIES ACCOUNTS Source: Endangered and Threatened Species of the Southeastern United States (The Red Book) FWS Region 4 -- As of 2/91 INDIANA BAT Myotis sodalis FAMILY: Vespertilionidae.